Is Celsius Energy Drink Bad For You? (The Real Deal)

Celsius Energy Drinks

Celsius is promoted as a fitness drink that provides you with the healthy energy you need to complement your active lifestyle.

The brand claims that its drinks are free of sugar, fat and preservatives. It also lists ginger root, green tea extract, guarana, and vitamins B and C as being among the many nutritious ingredients included in its drink blend.

But that’s not all.

Celsius energy drinks are also marketed as being thermogenic, meaning that it helps to increase your heart rate and metabolic rate by raising your body’s temperature. This is supposed to help you burn off more calories during your workout. So if weight loss is your goal, a beverage like this might interest you.

However, would drinking Celsius have any bad side effects?

Well, let’s find out.

What’s In A Can Of Celsius Energy Drink?

The ingredients list as seen on a can of Celsius energy drink.
Celsius energy drinks feature the Metaplus Proprietary Blend.

A 12 fl.oz (355ml) can of Celsius energy drink contains:

  • 2g carbohydrates
  • 200mg caffeine
  • 60mg vitamin C
  • 1.7mg riboflavin (vitamin B2)
  • 20mg niacin (vitamin B3)
  • 10mg pantothenic acid (vitamin B5)
  • 2mg pyridoxine (vitamin B6)
  • 300mcg biotin (vitamin B7)
  • 6mcg cobalamin (vitamin B12)
  • 50mg calcium
  • 50mcg chromium
  • 0g sodium

The drink also features the Metaplus Proprietary Blend which has:

  • Taurine
  • Guarana extract
  • Glucuronolactone
  • Ginger root extract
  • Green tea leaf extract

In small amounts, Celsius also has:

  • Carbonated filtered water
  • Citric acid
  • Fruit juice
  • Vegetable juice
  • Sucralose
  • Natural flavor

Is Celsius Energy Drink Bad For You?

In order to get a better idea of how good or bad Celsius would be for your health, let’s evaluate it in on the basis of these contents:

  1. Caffeine
  2. Sugar
  3. Vitamins and minerals
  4. Other notable ingredients  

Do take note that we won’t be doing an ingredient-by-ingredient assessment here, but looking at it in broader terms.

If you’re looking for a more detailed analysis of Celsius ingredients, you might want to hop on over to my other post instead.

Caffeine Content

Caffeine is great because it keeps you alert and helps you to concentrate. But too much caffeine is not good for your body either.

Celsius energy drink has 200mg of caffeine in each can and this is actually way more than I would suggest drinking in one serving. I usually limit myself to drinking between 50mg to 100mg of caffeine each time.

However, according to the recommendations of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), you are actually able to take up to 400mg of caffeine in a day.

That’s equivalent to two cans of Celsius.

If you have caffeine sensitivity, you might want to start off with drinking just taking a sip or two of Celsius first to see how your body reacts to the drink.

Since this drink has a pretty high level of caffeine in it, you should definitely avoid it if you have any health issues (especially heart related ones) or if you are pregnant or nursing.

Sugar Content

Here’s a bit of good news for you: Celsius is completely sugar-free.

So you don’t have to worry about your sugar intake whenever you reach for a can of Celsius.

That’s a relief, isn’t it?

Vitamins and Minerals

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that your body needs. They perform a multitude of useful things for you including healing wounds and beefing up your immune system. In the case of Celsius, the drink has been fortified with a significant number of vitamins and minerals which includes B and C vitamins, calcium, chromium and sodium.

This is a wider selection than what I’ve seen in some other competing products, so I’d say it’s something noteworthy about Celsius.

Other Notable Ingredients

Although Celsius doesn’t contain any sugar, its taste is still rather sweet and the reason for this is the presence of an artificial sweetener called sucralose.

Despite being a zero calorie sugar substitute, sucralose is actually 400–700 times sweeter than sugar.

This zero calorie sugar substitute may trigger health issues like:

  • Migraine
  • Insulin resistance
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Irritable bowel syndrome

So, you should still be careful about the quantity of Celsius drinks that you take and not go overboard with it.

Meanwhile, there didn’t seem to be any other preservatives added to Celsius, which is definitely a good thing.

I was also happy to see that quite a few natural ingredients such as ginger root, green tea, and fruit and vegetable juices had made it to the Celsius ingredients list.

Conclusion: So Is Celsius Energy Drink Bad For You?

The answer, oddly enough, is both a yes and a no.  

If you consume Celsius energy drinks in moderation, then it might actually do you some good, especially if you were trying to lose weight or intensify your workout routine.

Even though each can does contain a high level of caffeine, you’d still do fine as long as you don’t exceed the maximum caffeine limit of 400mg per day as advised by the FDA. 

But if you are not careful about controlling your intake, then drinking Celsius may become a bad thing for you as you’d be overdosing on caffeine. 

So it depends on you, mostly. That’s just my opinion, of course. You’d need to give the drink a try and make up your own mind about it.

Meanwhile, if you’d like to read a more detailed review on Celsius, you can visit this other post that I’ve written.

Can You Fall Sick From Drinking Too Many Celsius Energy Drinks?

View of a hospital room.
You could fall sick from too many Celsius energy drinks, but that could happen when you drink too much water too.

In a word: Yes. You could fall sick from drinking too many Celsius energy drinks.

But you could just as likely become ill from drinking too much water.

So it would not be correct to say that Celsius is bad for you just because of that. Too much of anything would be bad for your body.

Therefore, just make sure you don’t take too much Celsius at one time and you should be fine.

Also, please take heed of the health warnings included on the Celsius product label:

Do not exceed (2) servings per day.

Not recommended for people who are caffeine sensitive, children under 18, or women pregnant or nursing.

If you follow the advice given and don’t exceed two cans per day, then you shouldn’t be falling sick from drinking Celsius.

In What Ways Might Celsius Make Me Sick?

The ingredient in Celsius that would be most likely to make you sick would be the high amount of caffeine in the drink. (Since Celsius is sugar-free, we can exclude the side effects from sugar here.)

If you were to exceed your daily recommended limit for caffeine while drinking Celsius, you might face health problems such as these:

  • Headaches and migraines
  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Digestive issues
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Mental health issues
  • Increase in blood pressure

So consider yourself warned. Drinking too much Celsius can have an impact on your health if you’re not careful.

Is It Safe To Consume Celsius Energy Drink Every Day?

A can of Celsius energy drink placed on the floor.
Don’t drink more than two cans of Celsius in a day.

Yes, it’s safe and you can certainly have Celsius energy drinks every day.

Of course, this is assuming that you are a healthy individual and that you stay within your recommended daily dietary limits.

Based on our earlier discussion, this means that you shouldn’t be consuming anything more than two cans in a day. To be on the safe side, drink only half a can at a time rather than gulping down an entire can at once.

As mentioned earlier, don’t forget to take into account all the health warnings on the product label too. Avoid drinking Celsius if you are under 18, have caffeine sensitivities, or if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

If you’ve kept all of this in mind already, then you can go right ahead and have yourself a can of Celsius energy drink for your regular caffeine boost or as part of your pre-workout routine.

If it’s helpful, you can read about my personal experience trying out Celsius here.  

Where Can I Buy Celsius Energy Drinks From And How Much Are They?

Celsius is made in the US, so you should have no trouble finding it at most places that you frequent such as convenience stores or your local Walmart or Target stores.

Alternatively, you could also opt to make your purchase online. The only difference would be that you would need to cover shipping costs as well.

You can visit my other post for more information about the best places to buy Celsius online as well as some money-saving tips.

Based on what I saw at their online stores, a 12 fl.oz can of Celsius energy drink costs about $1.60 at Walmart and around $2 at Target.

Alternatives to Celsius Energy Drink

Here are some alternative energy drinks you can try instead of Celsius:

Or if you are the kind that prefers powdered energy drinks, here are some great ones you might want to look into:

REIZE

A sachet of REIZE placed next to a ready-made glass of the energy drink.
Give REIZE a try and see if you like it more than Celsius.

Like Celsius, REIZE is sugar-free too, but that’s where the similarities end.

REIZE only contains 50mg of caffeine per sachet, which is a more sensible amount in my opinion.

REIZE has many great ingredients too like ginseng, taurine and B vitamins that all work together to give you a great energy boost with no crash.

You can enjoy it anytime and anywhere as it’s compact in size and easy to take around in your pocket or bag.

There’s also the flexibility of adding it to any beverage that you like.

And you can even adjust the concentration of your energy drink to suit your needs by mixing less or more liquid to your REIZE powder. (As a reference, the standard recommendation is to add 8.4 fl.oz of liquid per sachet).

You can get REIZE sent right up to your doorstep for only around $1, and that includes shipping.

Give REIZE a try today and see whether you like it more than Celsius.

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Marty Spargo

I started my own energy drink brand in 2014 and am passionate about educating people about energy drinks so that they can properly understand the ingredients, benefits and risks without being influenced by the marketing messages put out by some brands. You can read my full bio here.

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