Entrepreneurs Category Page

Entrepreneurs

Congratulations you've made the deep plunge. You've stuck it to the man and have stridden out on your own to forge your own path and career. But what now? How does an entrepreneur such as yourself manage a startup business? Where to begin? How do you go about running a business? First things first, solidify who you are. What is the aim of your budding business? What are you selling, how are you selling it? Do your due diligence regarding risk management. Don't gamble your life savings and leave yourself or your partner at a huge loss. Be smart with your money. You can't build a business on dreams and ideas. Only actions and work will have positive outcomes. Second, build a team. This can't be a one-person show or you'll go broke and broken in a matter of months. Your team will be the backbone of your business. Giving it a frame and structure. Without a well-functioning backbone, it's difficult to get to where you want to go. And finally, get into action. Put your product/service out there. Engage in social media, send out press releases, tout your product and yourself wherever you go. This business is your baby now. Managing a startup can be tough. But with a little help from REIZE, it may be a little easier.

NEW ENTREPRENEURS BLOGS

Startup Business Management

Entrepreneurs are often too busy building their empires and improving their products that they underestimate the value of company culture. Company culture is not just about office game rooms, free snacks, or casual Friday. It’s about how your team works together. It's what your team believes in and what they value the most. In order for your team to collaborate effectively, you need to build a strong company culture. The startup culture has been a phenomenon in recent years where more and more entrepreneurs put a value on their own ideas and created their own business. Smaller teams and tighter budget calls for more creative thinking and collaboration - and more fun overall, even if times are tough. There's nothing like feeling like we are all on a mission together, bringing our product, our voice, our culture, to the world. Showing them what we can do.

Startup Culture

Entrepreneurs are often too busy building their empires and improving their products that they underestimate the value of company culture. Company culture is not just about office game rooms, free snacks, or casual Friday. It’s about how your team works together. It's what your team believes in and what they value the most. In order for your team to collaborate effectively, you need to build a strong company culture. The startup culture has been a phenomenon in recent years where more and more entrepreneurs put a value on their own ideas and created their own business. Smaller teams and tighter budget calls for more creative thinking and collaboration - and more fun overall, even if times are tough. There's nothing like feeling like we are all on a mission together, bringing our product, our voice, our culture, to the world. Showing them what we can do.

Marketing on a budget

There is a misconception that because most social medium platforms are free to use that you don't need to allocate a huge amount of your budget to marketing. Sure, you can just use Facebook, Instagram, or Snapchat? Actually, there is a lot more to it than that. It is impossible to manufacture a viral sensation. It is incredibly difficult to organically grow a following or fanbase without investing in your branding, in your image, in your product. Absolutely utilise those free platforms, but put some money behind them. Create a PR strategy. Network with other businesses in your market. Create genuinely great content on your sites that adheres to SEO strategies. Stay on top of trends. Meet your customers. All of these can cost money, but need not take up your whole budget. Know your value. Know your brand, and put it out there. Trust that if you build it - a great marketing plan - they will come.
Fuel Your IDEAS

Lessons from our founders

Working in a startup is not the same as working for a massive corporate business. An alternative mindset to that stereotypical of the corporate world is necessary. In that environment, salaries are perceived as an "every man for himself, take as much as you can" free-for-all. Things are different when you own a piece of the company. When the company is yours and you pour your savings into it, then you need to prepare yourself for the worst. Right off the bat, you can't expect the profits to come rolling in. Unless you are on the receiving end of some kind of fluke, chances are the first few years could be difficult. Don't drain your resources paying yourself. Check out one of our Salary Counter and face some hard truths about what it means to be an entrepreneur. It is important to understand that you are in it for the long game as a founder. Things won't always be easy. There will be nights that you will rethink and regret everything. You'll worry about wages, bills, deadlines, the people who are counting on you, and how this massive undertaking rests on your shoulders. But, then there are days that you couldn't imagine it any other way. It's a learning curve. Becoming your own boss. Forging your own path. Creating something that is all yours. That's a rush that even REIZE can't give you! (Unless you are the founders!)

Growth hacking Aussie Style

Gone are the old-fashioned business buzzwords of the Elevator Pitch and synergy. Nowadays, it's about disruption and growth hacking. Growth hacking is not just another elusive concept. It's actually pretty self-explanatory. Simply put as a growth hacker, every strategy you execute, every tool you implement and every technique you develop should be informed by your desire for growth. The singular goal of growth hacking is growth. But that isn't a narrow perspective. The best part of growth hacking is its flexibility. It doesn’t matter if you’re a one-man startup or a multinational corporation; growth hacking doesn’t discriminate and anyone can use it. The digital marketplace can be a difficult one to navigate. Marketers spend their days in a battle trying to capture more ground in their target demographics. We are all looking for a competitive advantage. There can be uncompromising targets, constraining budgets, limited resources and a surplus of competitors against a backdrop of advancing tools and platforms. A conventional approach is no longer enough. The only way to survive is to adapt. Whether this involves implementing an entirely new approach or refining a previous effort, there is value in “learning-by-doing”. Success, like most things, will come with a little bit of patience and practice. If nothing else, it will be an adventure.